Lockdown – Please keep up your monthly payments, we need it

In these uncertain times many members might feel that they should rather stop their monthly payments to the club. We have a lot of sympathy for that rationalization, but please realize that we as a club are very dependent on that income seeing that it is our only income currently. The Board and management team of Paarl Golf Club therefore urge members to continue with the diligent payment of their monthly subscriptions and unlimited golf fees.

A financial forecast has been prepared indicating that the Club should have enough reserves to stay liquid, should the lock down be enforced until the end of July 2020. This is however reliant on the members paying their monthly fees.

The fixed running cost of the Club is around R1 million per month, which includes the current emergency maintenance of the course, while no golfing income is earned.

As a further update to the discussions with the minister of sport on the possible opening up of golf courses earlier than level 1, I can report that the Club Managers Association of South Africa (CMASA) together with Golf RSA and the PGA have been invited to a meeting this afternoon, Thursday 30 April 2020, with the minister. We sincerely hope that this meeting will bring positive results for us in the golfing environment. Due to this meeting, it is almost a certainty that we will not be able to open the golf course for play on Friday the 1st of May. As soon as we have feedback from this meeting we will address our tee time booking schedule accordingly. I cannot see that we will open for restricted play before the middle of May 2020.

In the meantime I thought it a good idea to give you a view of the volunteer maintenance team driving out for their morning tasks. Again a huge thanks to all of them for doing this. I can assure you that the golf course will be ready for play when ever we get the green light from the minister. See the video here!

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

We anticipate another two weeks at least of total lockdown before we would be able to play some restricted golf. This means that our Covid-19 Disaster fund will need some replenishment if we would like to continue our payment to our caddies and those personnel reliant on a fully functional golf course.

Should any member wish to further contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name. We will ensure that full transparency allows anybody insight into the eventual distribution of these funds.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

    Please respect the lockdown rules

on the golf course

We are still finding golf balls and divots on the fairways and even pitch marks on certain greens which indicate that there are still people hitting balls on the golf course.

Please realise that if we were to be seen as ignoring the lockdown rules, the police have the right to come and shut us down. Many police vehicles are driving past our estate daily and it only takes one of them seeing somebody playing golf or just even hitting a few balls that can end everything for all of us.

Please note that we have eyes and ears all over the course so if you are going to ignore this warning, we will find you and issue you with a fine of a non-affiliated visitor which amounts to R695 based on our approved cancellation policy.

Many moons ago

Thanks to Francois Viljoen who identified two of the three gentlemen on the photo below.

On the left is Wilhelm van der Merwe who was at Stellenbosch University with Francois and also shared residency in the Dagbreek residence. In the middle is his older brother, Karel van der Merwe, who was a winemaker at the McGregor Cellar and later on started farming on his own in the Vredendal area. They were very good golfers according to Francois and won many a golf day here at Paarl, as well as Robertson Golf Club. Maybe somebody can help out with the man on the right.

I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

        African Hoopoe (Hoephoep)
  
Description

The African hoopoe is 25-28 centimeters (10-11 inches) in length and weighs 40-60 grams (1.4-2.1 ounces). It has a long, decurved bill, with cinnamon, black and white plumage and a long crest that raises when the bird is alarmed. Its wings are broad and rounded. The female is slightly duller than the male with less white in the secondary feathers. The juvenile has dull buff underparts with a shorter bill and buff tinge to the white wing bars.

Behaviour, feeding and breeding

The African hoopoe can be found in the Southern hemisphere of the entire Africa continent. It inhabits broadleaf forests and savannah. Hoopoes dart around at ground level collecting insects, small reptiles like lizards which they find in the ground and in animal faecal matter. They disrupt and turn over fallen leaves and plant matter and probe the ground for insects and food and then use their sharp bills for locating their prey.

They will also consume small amounts of seeds and occasionally berries, but not in large amounts, preferring insects and beetles etc.

The Hoopoe is a cavity nester (in tree holes, either natural or made by barbets or woodpeckers) or will happily use a hollow in a pile of boulders or cavities in buildings, always chosen and protected by the male. They lay from four to seven eggs over a period of a few days (sometimes taking a day’s break in-between).

Once she has finished laying all her eggs, the female alone will incubate the eggs for 14 – 16 days. Once hatched, the male does the hunting for the chicks for the first week of their lives and then the female gets involved in the feeding of her young.

Golf quote of the week

Better Golf: Lockdown Edition

By now I am sure that all golfers – me included – are so desperate to get back on the golf course again. Hopefully by the time it happens we have forgotten all our bad habits and can start fresh, on a clean page with only good and positive golfing thoughts.

This week we are going to focus on chipping. Chipping is one of the areas in the game that can save you a lot of shots off your scorecard.

There will be times when the putter can work nicely around the greens, but if you want to improve your chipping you need to put that putter away. It may be a short term solution using the putter, but in the long run you will do your game more harm than good.

Today we will go through the “chip-putt”, which you can play from a few feet off the green.  You will mainly be using a 7, 8 or 9-iron, but you can use a wedge if you do not want the ball to roll too much. Not to be confused with a chip and run, the chip-putt is played with a putting stroke and you can also use your putting grip.

Choke down on your club and use a putting-like setup. Make sure that your hands are quite high and that the club is resting on its toe. By hitting the ball more off the toe end of the clubface, you will “deaden” the impact, which will make it easier for you to control your speed and distance.


The setup

The grip

Hands high and ball on the toe of the club
You will find that you need to use a little more power than a normal chip and run shot, because you are taking your wrists out of the shot and mainly use a shoulder and arm stroke.


Backswing

Follow through
The idea is to pop the ball over the fringe, taking all the irregularities out and let it roll to the hole. You can even play this shot with a hybrid or fairway wood, you will be surprised how well it works.

Here’s a short video of an extra-ordinary shot that the brave ones can attempt!

Next week we will do some other basic chip shots that you will need when you are a bit further away from the green or when you need to chip over a bunker.

Good luck and stay safe.

Contact Ben if you would like more tips or drills on how you can improve your golf during the lockdown period.

 

A year for a journey shared

Golf is meant to be a journey shared. In fact, well over 50% of golfers say that “fun with friends” is MUCH more important than being super competitive. Golf is a ‘human’ pastime. This year threatened our humanity. So we want to put more friendship, more social, back into golf while encouraging you to reach new heights TOGETHER.
We’re looking for between 6 – 12 golfers to start a shared journey. From the 80s into the 70s on your scorecard. We want you to be the master of many golfing skills.
We want you to make new friendships forged by a common goal and grown by fun experience. We want you to encourage and nurture others on the pathway, while being humble enough to be nurtured and encouraged yourself.
This is going to be fun
At the end of this journey, you’ll have new friends, new playing partners, and a new feeling for the game. This will change everything for you. This will make 2020 a crazy good year, when until now it has only seemed crazy. Talk to us about this plan.
Contact Ben >
 

Keep moving.

Get into better swing positions

Being home doesn’t mean you can’t work on your golf game. Your physical conditioning is just as important as technique and course management. Improving your mobility from home means that when you’re back on the course, you can hit the ground running.
To get into position at the top of your backswing as well as through impact and into your finish, your shoulders have to externally rotate. If your shoulder mobility is limited, you’ll struggle to consistently swing on plane. It also puts a lot of strain on your elbow through impact and over time can lead to “tennis elbow”.
 
Here are several exercises that can help to improve your shoulder mobility. And all you’ll need to do them is a few square feet of space.
Watch video >
We’re here to keep you mobile
For more ideas on what you can do to keep your golf game sharp, please
Give Ben a call >

Lockdown – Will we be able to play on

the 1st of May 2020?

By now all our golfers are asking this question and we await the President’s address this evening.

What I can relay to our members is that behind the scenes, there is a lot of negotiating going on in order to make this dream a reality. The President will most likely tonight declare a limited reprieve of the lockdown rules that will be based on a risk adjustment strategy that was developed over the last few days. Unfortunately, this document does not differentiate golf from any other sporting code and all sporting events are currently seen under the same category. This will not help our cause to make golf a social distancing capable sport.

To counter that, the Club Managers Association of South Africa (CMASA), together with Golf RSA and the PGA, has documented a plea to government to look at golf as a possible social distancing sport that might be able to be played under strict rules. BUT at least we will be able to get on the course and play the game we love. This letter was handed to the minister earlier this week. We sincerely hope that this plea will not fall on deaf ears, but will be seen as a sporting code that is trying to make ends meet under these trying conditions.

The following best practice for golf clubs were “offered” in this plea to government:

•    Golf Clubs to offer a “one-tee” start only.
•    Tee time intervals between fourballs to be limited to a minimum of 10 minutes. Luckily Paarl did that a long time ago.
•    No congregation of people/golfers/staff at any given time of the day.
•    Upon arrival at the golf course, all staff/members/visitors/golfers to be tested for elevated temperatures through recommended non-invasive measures. Any person with an elevated temperature will be denied access to the golf club.
•    Walking during playing will be encouraged, rather than using a cart.
•    Golf clubs to facilitate minimum employment of caddies by golfers to ensure social distancing between golfers whilst on the golf course.
•    Golfers will be obliged to wear face masks when in 5 metre proximity of each other.
•    Basic toilet facilities will be provided and duly cleaned every few hours as required. Locker room facilities will be a no go area for golfers.
•    Flagsticks will be regularly sanitized and should be handled minimally. Removing of the ball from the cup will be aided by some measure to prevent golfers from sticking their hands too deep in the hole.
•    Frequent cleaning and sanitizing of high touch areas of golf carts and /or making hand sanitisers/wipes available in carts.
•    Spacing of golf carts in the applicable area an appropriate distance apart to encourage social distancing of 1,5m or more.
•    Only one person per cart.
•    All bunker rakes to be removed.
•    All water fountains and ball washers will be closed and covered.

Let us hope that we will get the green light on this. Should this be accepted by government we will be ready for business based on these above rules for opening on the 1st of May 2020. We will change the tee-times accordingly if we get the go ahead. Let us hold all our thumbs for this to be accepted.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people working for PGC without an income during this period. We started with the second round of distribution of these funds to the intended recipients last week. We are trying to ensure that those people working at the club and are dependant on a fully functioning club such as the caddies, the waiters and barmen. This will help them to at least have some “income” during these challenging times.

Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name. We will ensure that full transparency allows anybody insight into the eventual distribution of these funds.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

    Please respect the lockdown rules

on the golf course

Members might think that I had too much to sample, making a headline like the above. But you will not believe what we see and experience while busy with the maintenance of the golf course. Remember it is illegal to play any sort of golf on the course during lockdown and we will have to do something to the culprits who keep on ignoring this basic rule.

For those of you who don’t believe me, here are some photographs from yesterday’s (Wednesday’s) discoveries from some of the volunteers who are helping with the maintenance of the golf course during lockdown.

Far left fresh divots on the 26th fairway with fresh unrepaired pitchmarks on the 26th green (there were 15 pitch marks that weren’t repaired). I do not understand the thinking behind something like this. It is illegal to be on the course and if we catch you or just positively identify you PGC will fine the culprit/s. Be warned!
And if that was not shocking enough, here is proof of a divot on the 20th green. This person did not even have the audacity to repair this divot and just left it there for somebody else to try and fix. Again I say, be warned!

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anville van Wyk who identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar who was a member at PGC for many years. Maybe lockdown is a good time for bringing back those memories. Please help with the two gentleman on both sides of Edwin.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. There were no takers last week so we’ll run this one again.

I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

Forrest Buzzard (Bosjakkalsvoel)

Special thanks to Mike Ling who pointed out that we had this visitor around the last few days of lockdown.

Description

The forest buzzard is very similar to the abundant summer migrant steppe buzzard Buteo buteo vulpinus, the head, the back and upperwings are brown, marked out with rufous edges to the feathers the amount of which varies between individuals. The chin is whitish and unmarked, the breast and belly are whitish but marked with a variable amount of brown spots, and the undertail coverts are plain whitish. There is variation and some adults show brown barring along the breast sides and the belly while all but the palest birds show a distinctive white ‘U’ mark in the middle of the otherwise blotched abdomen. The underwings are white, with a reddish-brown tinge on the lesser underwing coverts and a dark comma shaped mark at the tip of primary coverts . The plumage on the thighs are uniformly reddish-brown, and the axillary feathers are white with brown barring. The upper tail is brown, washed with reddish-brown and the tail has some narrow dark brown bands with a broad dark brown subterminal band while the undertail bands can be indistinct. The body length is 41–48 cm and the wingspan is 102–117 cm.

Behaviour , feeding and breeding

The forest buzzard hunts along the edge of or in the forest, where it is a sit and wait predator which pounces on prey from a perch. It has been recorded as preying on small mammals, birds up to the size of a francolin, snakes, lizards, frogs, grasshoppers, wasps, beetles and scorpions and in our particular case squirrels.

Its breeding biology is little known but it is thought to be territorial and monogamous. The nest is a large structure of sticks with an interior cup, lined with green leaves and sometimes with beard lichen Usnea spp. It is typically situated in the fork or lower branch of a tree in the forest interior, especially pines or eucalyptus but also indigenous trees such as small-leaved yellowwood (Afrocarpus falcatus).

The two eggs are laid in the period from August–November, with most being laid in September–October. The eggs are laid asynchronously so the first laid hatches first and the older sibling is aggressive to its younger chick, preventing it from having food and if food is scarce the younger one will starve. They fledge at about 47 days old and become fully independent roughly four months.

Golf quote of the week

Better Golf: Lockdown Edition

This week we are going to look at one of the most difficult shots in golf – the 50 metre pitch shot. Most golfers can shave many shots off their score if they can master this tricky shot.

Why is this shot so difficult for most golfers? Well, the reason is that it is in between a chip shot and a full shot for most people, making it a half shot that needs to be played with feel and control. Most of the time, you are going to use one of your wedges to perform this shot.

The setup: A common fault with many golfers is that they are trying to help the ball into the air with this shot. Therefore, they setup with their upper bodies behind the ball and their weight leaning too far back. This will cause the clubhead to reach the bottom of the arc too early in the downswing, which will cause fat or thin shots.

In the correct setup you need to have your shoulders more level so that your chest is directly over the ball. Keep the ball position in the middle of your stance with your feet not too far apart. Your weight must be slightly on your front foot.


Wrong setup

Correct setup
The shot: The key element in the swing is to use your bigger muscles to control the shot. You do this by turning your chest away from the ball and letting your wrists hinge naturally in the back swing. Then in the downswing you turn your chest back to and through the ball, with your arms and hands following.


Backswing

Impact

Follow through
The length and speed of your swing, back and through will determine the distance that you will hit the ball.  For this shot you will need a half or three quarter swing back and through. The turning motion of your body, combined with a steady head and good rhythm should make the club shallow out in the same place on the ball every time, leaving you with a consistent strike. Very important to remember that you should never take big divots with this shot.

What you do not want to do when you play this shot is to keep your body dead still and only swing your arms and hands. This will lead to inconsistency and will make you use your smaller muscles which will fail under pressure.


Incorrect backswing

Incorrect follow through
Now is a good time to practice this method at home. If you cannot do this with a golf ball, just try and sweep the grass in the same spot every time. By building up some muscle memory you will find it much easier once you get out on the golf course.

Contact Ben if you would like more tips or drills on how you can improve your golf during the lockdown period.

 

Make it a crazy good year

If you’re shooting in the 90s then what if it took less than 20 hours of learning, practice, and feedback to get into the 80s?
If we can help you sharpen just 4 skills: the half-wedge shot; the short pitch; the chip; and the greenside bunker shot, you could be turning double bogeys into bogeys or pars. You won’t be spoiling holes or frustrating yourself when you’ve been in a solid position.
“There’s a real power to standing within 50 metres of the flag and knowing you’re in control. And it’s intimidating for anyone you’re playing against. More importantly you walk off more greens with a real feeling of satisfaction.”
Is there a plan for you?
Let’s have a conversation. We can start it by phone if required. But let’s start. Would an improvement in your short-game deliver you the biggest improvement in enjoyment and quiet satisfaction this year? It’s been a troubled start, but let’s plan to start out on a great journey. Come on…
Contact Ben >

Keep moving.

A few minutes a day for better rotation

Being home doesn’t mean you can’t work on your golf game. Your physical conditioning is just as important as technique and course management. Improving your mobility from home means that when you’re back on the course, you can hit the ground running.
Rotation is the most fundamental movement of the golf swing. When your hips are loose, you’re able to rotate fully and generate the swing speed you’re capable of. Sitting a lot tightens your hips, but with just a few minutes a day you can loosen up and improve your mobility.
In this quick video, strength and conditioning expert Mike Boyle explains how to improve your hip range of motion and avoid lower back pain.
Watch video >
We’re here to keep you mobile
For more ideas on what you can do to keep your golf game sharp, please
Give Ben a call >

Life goes on – although on a drip

A big word of thanks must go out to all the residents from Boschenmeer Estate who volunteered to help with the adopt a green/fairway campaign. Unfortunately, we could not officially do that during lockdown, seeing that we only have a limited amount of emergency maintenance permits available for the course. We will relook this campaign once we go back to normal.

The normal emergency maintenance with volunteers (each with their own emergency maintenance permits) will continue.

We do see a lot of people walking, jogging and cycling on the estate. Please note that it is illegal to do that under the current lockdown rules and we should all refrain from doing that. Should you decide to walk to the Golfing Goat Halfway House Deli, please do so, but refrain from sitting in front of the Halfway House having a coffee and not adhering to the social distancing regulations.

We thank Golfing Goat for really stepping up their offering during this period and hope that the residents of Boschenmeer will continue to support them.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. We started with the second round of distribution of these funds to the intended recipients this week. We are trying to ensure that those people working at the club and is dependant of a full functional club such as the caddies, the waiters and barmen will at least have some “income” during these challenging times.

Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name. We will ensure that full transparency allows anybody insight into the eventual distribution of these funds.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

  Reminder of auction

We are celebrating Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine.

Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anville van Wyk who identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar who was a member at PGC for many years. We still need the two gentlemen on the side of Edwin so I will run with photo this week as well.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

White Backed Mousebird (Witkruis Muisvoel)
Description

The white-backed mousebird (Colius colius) is a large species of mousebird. It is distributed in western and central regions of southern Africa from Namibia and southern Botswana eastwards to Gauteng and the Eastern Cape.

This mousebird prefers scrubby dry habitats, such as thornveld, fynbos scrub and semi-desert.
This bird is about 34 cm (13.5 in) long, with the tail comprising approximately half the length, and weighs 38–64 g (1.3–2.3 oz). The upper parts, head, prominent crest and breast are grey apart from a white back stripe flanked by two broad black stripes and a dark red, or maroon, transverse band at the base of the tail. The white is not visible unless the wings are at least partly open, such as when the birds are alighting, or sometimes in hot weather. The belly is buff in colour. The bill is bluish white with a black tip, and the legs and feet are red.

The speckled mousebird can be distinguished from this species by its differently coloured beak, legs and upperparts.

Behaviour and feeding

This is a markedly social bird, with small groups of presumably related birds feeding together and engaging in mutual preening. It roosts in groups at night. Its perching habits are amusingly parrot-like; it often almost hangs from its legs rather than squatting on them like most birds, and commonly with each leg gripping a different upright branch.

The white-backed mousebird is a frugivore which subsists on fruits, berries, leaves, seeds and nectar. It also will feed on the buds of some plants, sometimes to the extent of stripping the branches of ornamentals such as fiddlewoods. Its feeding habits make it very unpopular with fruit farmers and domestic gardeners, which might be why it is very shy as a rule. When it spots a human it either sits quietly in a tree or takes off immediately. Sometimes it will settle on lawns when the grass is flowering and feed on the grass stigmata and stamens. In the wild its fruit-eating habits are an important factor in disseminating seeds of indigenous berry-producing plants such as Halleria lucida. However, it also spreads the seeds of invasive aliens such as Cotoneaster.

Breeding

These sedentary birds may breed at any time of the year when conditions are favourable. The nest is a large cup well hidden in a thicket. Nestlings are fed by both parents and also by helpers, usually young birds from previous clutches.

Golf quote of the week

Better Golf: Lockdown Edition

This week I am going to give you a drill that you can do at home during the lockdown period. The drill is to improve your swingpath, a very important aspect of the golf swing.

Before I give you the drill, I first of all have to explain what the correct swingpath is: The correct swingpath (clubhead path) in the impact area is from inside to inside. This means that the clubhead swings into the ball from slightly inside the intended line, briefly on a straight line through the ball, then moves back inside the line on the follow through. This path will give you the best chance to square your clubface at impact and send the ball down the straight line.

In picture 2 you can see the correct and incorrect swingpaths (either too much from the outside or too much from the inside).

The drill:

1. Place 2 clubs down on the ground and align them to your target. One at your toes and one outside the clubhead.

2. Make 2 rows of tees. The outside row in a straight line and the inside row on a slight halfmoon curve.

3. Your clubhead should just fit in between the 2 rows of tees. Put another tee where the ball should be.

4. Aim your feet and clubhead towards the target.

5. Try and swing the club through the 2 rows of tees and try to hit the tee in the middle. You should only touch the tee in the middle.

6. If you have a net at home, you can do this drill with a golf ball.  Hitting into a net will make you concentrate more on your swingpath and stop you from worrying about the result of your shot.

Just an example of how not to do it at home!

 
Final thought: When you get out on the golf course again … keep an eye on your divots.  They will tell you whether your swingpath is correct or not.

Contact Ben if you would like more tips or drills on how you can improve your golf during the lockdown period.

 

Blowing away another myth.

It’s quicker than you think.

Thinking about your golf game, where would an improvement make the most difference? Not just to your scorecard or your handicap, but to how much you enjoy the game. If you are struggling with enjoyment, then there’s a good chance it’s one of these skills:
Too many shots in the rough, lost in the woods, or far too short. Hole spoiled before you start.
Can’t get the ball up on good trajectory. Too inconsistent. It’s a struggle tee to green.
Too many golfers sit in one or both these categories. They’re under 100 sometimes but often struggle with that target. If that’s you I’m betting you love your friends, and the outdoors, but the game itself is frustrating. So let’s blow a myth away.
It might take 10,000 hours to be an elite level golfer, but what if it took less than 20 hours of practice to MASTER one skill?
I’m interested, tell me more
The key to mastering a skill is not bashing away endlessly with minimal or no improvement. The right improvement identified and explained. Simple steps. The right deliberate practice drills. The right feedback. Pick a skill. Start a conversation with us. Now’s a good time.
Contact Ben >
 

Keep moving.

Strengthen your foundation

Being home doesn’t mean you can’t work on your golf game. Your physical conditioning is just as important as technique and course management. Improving your mobility from home means that when you’re back on the course, you can hit the ground running.
A good golf swing starts at your ankles. Being able to stay in position while transferring weight from your back foot to your front foot during the downswing requires ankle mobility. Lacking ankle mobility leads to early extension and inconsistent ball striking.
This exercise will help you improve your ankle mobility. And all you’ll need to do it is a few square feet of space.
Watch video >
We’re here to keep you mobile
For more ideas on what you can do to keep your golf game sharp, please
Give Ben a call >

Paarl Golf Club is maintained during lockdown and we are giving up greens for adoption

A big word of thanks goes out to all the individuals who give up their valuable lockdown time to make sure we have a fully functional golf course when we go out of lockdown again. Thanks also to all the residents and other members who keep on motivating the team, as well as to give their names up for any additional tasks that might be needed during this time.

Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

Thank you to all who refrain from using the golf course during this period. Not only is it illegal to do that but we also need to give the course the rest it deserves.

We have started an adopt a green concept where residents close to a specific green becomes an observer on behalf of the club, as well as to give personal attention to that specific green. I have the following people attending to the following greens and from the list it would be clear that I still need quite a number of people to attend to all 27 greens.

Green 1:
Green 2:
Green 3:
Green 4:
Green 5: Dawie and Yvette Theron
Green 6:
Green 7:
Green 8:
Green 9:
Green 10: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 11: Willem Pretorius and Alida Kotzee
Green 12: Steph Lotz and son
Green 13: Christian van Schalkwyk
Green 14: Herman Matthee
Green 15:
Green 16:
Green 17: Jacques, Ruan and Loween Olivier
Green 18: Werner Bernhardt
Green 19: Pieter Joubert
Green 20: Johan van Zyl
Green 21: Annemie du Toit and Helaine Strydom
Green 22: George Bezuidenhout and Franz Lohbauer
Green 23: Dawie and Linki Malan
Green 24: Lana Ehlers and Family
Green 25: TBC Have a person ready.
Green 26: Anton, Alma and Jere Brits
Green 27: Anton, Alma and Jere Brits

Please let me know which green you would like to adopt and I will come and “train” you on what to do as well as to provide you with the necessary tools and material to do that. Our next adoption will be the fairways so start thinking what you would like to help with. Fairways would mostly be filling up of divots and flattening the mole heaps. Sound easy enough?

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 disaster fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lock down period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund please feel free to use the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

A quick feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R100 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. Should the lockdown be extended we now have some funds to work with to ensure some income to those that were reliant on golfers on the course.

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anton Bezuidenhout who identified the gentleman on the left as Dan du Plessis (long standing member at Durbanville and according to Anton always dressed in jacket and tie for the prizegiving ceremony). Now we just need the man to the right of Allistair. Still unknown.

Thanks to Anville van Wyk who helped with the man on the left to be our own Peter Dryer who was a previous captain of PGC and did a lot for PGC over the years. The man on the right was Boland Golf Union President at that point in time, but we still need his name.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Again Anville van Wyk identified the man in the middle to be Edwin Grobbelaar, who was a member at PGC for many years. We still need the two gentlemen on the side of Edwin so I wil run with the same photo this week.

Know your birdies from your eagles

Fiery Necked Nightjar (Afrikaanse Naguil)
Description

It is at this time that the ever present and humble Fiery-necked Nightjar (Caprimulgus pectoralis) drums out its distinctive and characteristic call described by birders as “good Lord deliver us”. The call is particularly audible through the full moon phase, less so on darker nights.

Many of you will have encountered the Fiery-necked Nightjar on your evening game drives. It is the most common Nightjar, about 23cms in size, and is nocturnal by habit, feeding on insects which fly about after dark. Although this Nightjar may choose to hunt its dinner from arboreal posts, it is very often found sitting on road surfaces. They are often blinded by oncoming vehicle headlights, “sitting tight” until the very last second, before flying off in a disorientated manner. They are very well camouflaged. No wonder we unfortunately see so many of them succumb as road kills.

The Fiery-necked Nightjar was first described by Cuvier around 1816. Other common names for this bird are South African Nightjar, Pectoral Nightjar, Cuvier’s Nightjar and African Dusky Nightjar. In Afrikaans, it is called Afrikaanse naguil. Fiery-necked Nightjars have a very large range, estimated at over 4 500 000 square kilometers, and therefore exceeds the thresholds for vulnerable range sizes. Its population is considered to be stable. It occurs widely in Africa, ranging from South Africa as far north as Kenya. It enjoys the lower elevations in southern Africa and is scarce in the dry regions.

Behaviour and feeding

They are primary nocturnal birds, and is usually spotted during night time game drives. They are usually difficult to spot during day time with their camouflage type patterns which resembles bark and leaves.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is primarily a solitary bird, which is very agile in flight. This enables them to catch insects without much effort. Their large eyes enable them to hunt effectively in the dark. They can open their mouths extremely large, which enables them to catch insects much more efficient during flight.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar has as well a special middle claw (pectern) which enables them to groom themselves, and get rid of parasites and dust.

The Fiery Necked Nightjar is Insectivorous and feeds primarily on: Beetles, butterflies and moths, cockroaches, termites and mantis, lacewings and antlions, grasshopper’s bee’s wasps and ants and flies.

They usually forage at dusk up until the middle of the night, or longer if the moon provides a bit of light. They like to hunt from a branch, and when catching a juicy insect then it will usually return to the same perch to feed.

Breeding

Breeding occurs during the months from August to January, the hens laying their eggs on bare ground. Both sexes take turn to incubate the eggs (18 days) and look after the chicks. The chicks are able to fly when they are about 18 to 20 days old. Fiery-necked Nightjars are monogamous and mate for life. Both sexes have almost similar plumage.

Golf quote of the week

Paarl Golf Club is maintained during lockdown

By now we are all settled down in our lockdown state. Keep it up and make South Africa a safe place again.

We have successfully trained a number of volunteers on the estate to drive the different golf course maintenance vehicles in order to keep maintaining the golf course at a high level. We would like to ensure our members and visitors that we will be ready for business come the 17th of April 2020.

A big word of thanks go out to these individuals who give up their valuable lockdown time to make sure we have a fully functional golf course when we go out of lockdown again. Thanks also to all the residents and other members who keep on motivating the team as well as to give their names up for any additional tasks that might be needed during this time. Wynand Viljoen, our greenkeeper, is running this team like a well-oiled machine and ensures that when the team starts in the morning, everything is ready for them. Thanks Wynand, your efforts are well noted and respected.

Should any member staying on the estate like to help please be in contact with me via manager@paarlgc.co.za or 082 373 4455.

Thank you to all who refrain from using the golf course during this period. Not only is it illegal to do that but we also need to give the course the rest it deserves.

Heroes off the course

A big word of thanks must also go to the Golfing Goat Halfway House Deli who really stepped up their offering during this lockdown period. Please support them in their endeavour to bring you a fully-fledged convenient store experience where you can buy anything you need to stay alive and happy during this period.

Covid-19 Disaster Fund

A big word of thanks needs to go out to quite a number of members who decided together to create a Covid-19 Disaster Fund for Paarl Golf Club. These funds will be used to ensure that people who were reliant on the golf club to be fully functional can have some “income” during the lockdown period. These are the caddies, the waiters and barmen at Golfing Goat. Should any other member wish to contribute to this fund, please feel free to donate to the following bank account with the reference Covid-19 and your name.

Banking details

Bank: Nedbank
Branch code: 198765
Account number: 1470120097
Reference: Covid-19 and name

Some feedback on this initiative is that we have secured close to R85 000 in this fund that will help a lot of people functioning at the club without an income during this period. Thank you to everyone who has contributed thus far!

King Louis auction

We are going to celebrate Louis Oosthuizen’s Open win from 10 years ago by auctioning some very special Louis Oosthuizen memorabilia. The best part is that you can bid for the auction electronically. The link to use is https://forms.gle/zQs6sLXwWYoiAtzR9

There are three different auction items and they will also have a reserve price connected to them. The first item is The Duke Handmade in St. Andrews Scotland Hickory Putter all the way from the course where Louis won the 2010 Open.

The second item is a very special bottle of wine. The label is signed by Louis himself and has a picture of him kissing the famous Claret Jug.

This bottle, together with a photograph of Louis taken during that particular Open, is framed in a once-in-a-lifetime memory of this momentous occasion.

The third item is a magnum bottle of Roodeberg Collector’s Edition wine. You may ask “What does that have to do with Louis who has his own brand of wine?” It is actually very simple. It is the one wine that has got two ‘o’s in its name, as in Oosthuizen.
Make a bid >

Many moons ago

Thanks to Anton Bezuidenhout who identified the gentleman on the left as Dan du Plessis (long standing member at Durbanville and according to Anton always dressed in jacket and tie for the prizegiving ceremony). Now we just need the man to the right of Allistair.

Adrian Moon identified the golfer below as Johan Kruger who was a brilliant amateur in the 90s and also went on to play professional golf. He is also an old Gimmie. Now we need identification of the two gentlemen on either side.

The photograph this week from the treasure chest is the one below. I sincerely hope that I would receive some feedback on who the gentlemen on the photograph are. Please e-mail me at manager@paarlgc.co.za if you recognise the gentlemen on the photo.

Know your birdies from your eagles

    Speckled Mousebird (Gevlekte Muisvoel)
 
Description

This bird is about 35 cm (14 inches) long, with the tail comprising approximately half the length, and weighs about 57 grams (2 oz). It is well-named, because it is dull-mousy brown in overall colour on the back and on the head (including a prominent crest). The bill is black on the upper part and is a pinkish colour on the lower part. The rare white-headed mousebird can be confused with this species, but the differently coloured mandibles and the lack of a bare grey orbital patch render the Speckled species distinctive.

The speckled mousebird is not known for its voice, as songbirds are, although it is a noisy creature. They make a warbling tsu-tsu call while in flight, and are known for their tisk-tisk alarm call while in flight.

Behaviour and feeding

It is distributed from Cameroon east to Eritrea and Ethiopia, south through eastern Africa to southern South Africa. Most habitats are suitable for this species, except the rainforests and more arid areas. This mousebird prefers open bushveld habitats. It is widespread in savanna and open woodlands, as well as areas with tangled thickets. It is a common “backyard bird,” often seen in urban areas that contain gardens and orchards.

The speckled mousebird is a frugivore which subsists on fruits, berries, leaves, seeds and nectar, and is fairly strict in its choice of food from area to area.

These are conspicuously social birds, feeding together and engaging in mutual preening. They also accompany each other when they go to ground to dust bathe (also to occasionally to swallow pebbles to assist in grinding up vegetation as they digest it). Upon nightfall, they roost in very tight groups of 20 or so birds and on cold nights they can become torpid. Being in a torpid state could make them easy prey, but the large groups are apparently effective enough to deter most nocturnal predators.[

Breeding

These creatures may breed at any time of the year. The nest is a large (for the bird) and untidy cup made of vegetable and animal material (sometimes including cloth and paper) and is constructed by both the male and female. Clutch size ranges from one to seven eggs (apparently based on latitude), but usually averages 3–4. Nestlings are fed by both parents and also by helpers, which usually are juveniles from previous clutches. The incubation period is fourteen days and the offspring will leave the nest for the first time at about seventeen or eighteen days. After a little over a month, the nestlings will begin foraging for themselves.

Golf quote of the week